Stylist Feature: Bulltown | Lizann Villatoro

Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Hi, Lizann. We are looking forward to getting to know you and your story!  Would you start by sharing who you are and how you find your way to starting your creative pursuits as a music stylist?

Musician/Stylist. I started my stylist pursuit while I was experiencing an ebb in my musical inspiration. As a creative I know that it’s natural to experience ebbs and flows in the creative process. I’m incredibly lucky to have been able to find another medium to express my creativity. 

It’s very clear that music has always been a part of your journey, but when did you decide to start pairing fashion with music?

Music and fashion are inherently connected as they are both forms of artful expression. For me, both music and fashion stem from the same creative place.  It seemed natural to keep them both as a major role in my journey. 

How has your connection to your roots played a role in your style and views on fashion?

I’m a first generation American and as a kid all I wanted to do was ‘fit in’. I gathered that society was very into labels and name brand property and I knew that was something I would never have. Now as an adult, I’ve reflected on the ‘why’ of many aspects of my life and my relationship with my clothing took a huge hit. I discovered that clothing doesn’t make my person instead I bring life into whatever I pull together and I own it. 

I discovered that clothing doesn’t make my person, instead, I bring life into whatever I pull together and I own it.
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Vintage has always been your playground, but when did you make the connection between how you styled yourself and sustainability?

2015 was a big year for me. It was the year I was involved in the INNOVATIONS Fashion Show and I truly decided NO MORE NEW CLOTHING. At all. 

I began to curate my own style and only attained ‘new to me’ clothing through thrifted and vintage stores or clothing swaps. As I dove deeper into the effects that clothing industries have on our environment it became clear that sustainable fashion was a top priority in my life. It’s a lifestyle.

What does your styling process look like? How do you approach shopping for yourself? For others?

My styling process varies. Sometimes one garment can define the look and other times the look can define the garment. When I’m out shopping for ‘new to me’ clothing I look for items that speak to me. I consider myself a spiritual thrifter and believe that garments often times will choose me to continue their story. It’s an honor to continue the story of a garment. 

You use a lot of song titles and lyrics in your posts. Where do you find or draw up inspiration? 

I began to pair my styling with lyrics from songs that were currently inspiring my own song writing. I came to a point where I knew that the styling work I was doing was coming from the same place that my music comes from. I’m more active on my social media page when I’ve come to a lull in my musical process. Therefore, I draw up inspiration from music I’m listening to that I hope will either spark up inspiration or I quote a song that I just can’t shake out of my head.

What is the vintage and thrift scene like in Minneapolis? How would you describe it to someone who isn’t from here?

The vintage and thrift scene is THRIVING. I would describe it as a scene that is full of creativity. From vintage pop-ups to brick and mortar vintage shops; to the vast variety of thrift stores in and around the Twin Cities, I’m always bound to find something that will spark inspiration.

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How do you see yourself living your values through your style or work? Do you talk about sustainability to your friends or followers? 

Living my values through a sustainable fashion lifestyle is crucial. We are at a time, in our environment, where every little bit of effort counts. I believe that, as a community, we are doing work that’s important when we talk about sustainable fashion on any sort of platform. 

There are people who are really listening and want to create a better environment. I think thrifting before buying, as well as swapping/looking in your own closet are easy first steps for someone who is new to hearing about ways to help our environment. I especially see the shift in up and coming young creatives in our community. Thrifting and vintage shopping is becoming more of a destination point and whether they’re aware or not they’re helping our future visionaries see more inclusive possibilities.

Living my values through a sustainable fashion lifestyle is crucial. We are at a time, in our environment, where every little bit of effort counts.
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What are some of the biggest challenges you face as a stylist and creative? 

I think the biggest challenges I have faced as a stylist/musician are appropriate opportunities. I participate in projects that align with my sustainable life values, especially when giving time and effort. I am very selective about projects that I want to be involved with and it can be disheartening to say no. 

What do you see as the biggest challenge for the fashion industry that you’d like to see change?

I think one of the biggest challenges for the fashion industry is supply and demand. I know society is trying to ‘keep up with the Kardashians’ but a slow down in our societal need for consuming would allow us to tap into our own resources. 

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Thrifting and vintage shopping are becoming more of a destination point and whether they’re aware or not they’re helping our future visionaries see more inclusive possibilities.
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What is one thing you can’t get enough of right now? Are you following anyone that we should know about? 

One thing I can’t get enough of are historic fashion accounts on instagram. @lostinhistorypics and @samanthaasam. I love seeing history displayed in garments and it tends to spark a lot of creativity within me.

Anything you wish people knew about vintage fashion, styling, or shopping?

Know your measurements, carry around a measuring tape along with your reusable bag and be creative. Take it slow. It’s just clothing. There’s no need to dump all your purchases from fast fashion. Instead, make it work for you. Always take inventory and only buy what you need. 

Follow the musical stylings and vintage adventures of Lizann Villatoro at @bulltown